Google Translate – the fiend of professional translators

GOOGLE TRADUCTOR – el diablilllo de los traductores profesionales

Crusade against the Dragon – GoogleTranslator

As a starting point, we all take it that Google Translator does not give a quality translation and that it is, nevertheless, taking work off us translators. The point about this participatory blog – as you add your comments, I incorporate them in the text below – is to stir us up into doing something about it .I suggest that each of us find a text that we have already translated, set up a Word page in 4 columns and paste the original, our manual translation, the Google Translator text and the 4th column for comments.

GOOGLE TRANSLATION – a client in Spain told me that “the trend is for companies to use G.T. to cut back on costs, regardless of the quality”. Perhaps us translators should start by informing each other about its quality (or lack of) and then warn clients…..

TRADUCTOR GOOGLE – un cliente en España me dijo que “la tendencia es que las empresas utilicen T.G. para recortar costes, sin importar la calidad”. Quizás nos toca a nosotros los traductores a informarnos de su calidad (o falta de) y posteriormente avisar a los clientes.

This is a blog designed to help us focus on Google Translator, its quality, clients’ expectations, its effects on the translation market, and anything else that pops up in the course of our contributions. I take it for granted that those of us involved in providing quality translations do not use G.T. at all or, at least just to look the odd term, but certainly not to present to our clients. On that basis, I think it would be useful for us all to contribute here with ideas, studies, or whatever since forewarned is forearmed, as the old adage has it. Because if we are not fore-whatever, Dragoogletran will continue to wrecklessly wreck our professional arena, running amoc by making a mockery of quality translations and generally ruining translators and clients alike, to such an extent that no longer will the quick brown fox jump over the whatever, but it will be the “stork plays the saxophone behind the lazy dog.” (see below).

I’m trying to draw forces together to set up a Holy Crusade of translators against the Devouring Dragon known as Google Translator. I have already had reports from clients in Spain saying that clients who normally commission translations are now doing it for free on Google Translator, and blow the quality. Any hope of translators translation work coming from Twitter, for example, despite it’s expansionist policy, have already been dashed with: “Twitter to Become a Charity”. According to ReadWriteWeb blog, Twitter’s plans for international expansion will need to include translation, and just like with Facebook, it will likely come from free translation work. “We’re pretty sure Twitter would have no problem finding some Chinese speakers to translate the login page and the account settings and whatever else, pro bono,” writes ReadWriteWeb’s Mike Melanson after discussing Twitter’s future plans with Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey.

What are the differences between Google Translator and other similar free M.T. translation applications?

http://www.appappeal.com/app/google-language-tools/

The majority of the other translation applications based their systems on SYSTRAN software; this included the likes of Babelfish and later Windows Live Translate. However, Google decided to take a completely different route and instead wrote their own software which seems to work pretty well. Of course no machine translation package is completely foolproof or will work 100% of the time, the output is sometimes either gibberish or lacks the correct grammar and punctuation. Google Translate has the greatest number of translation options on the internet, and can translate to and from many different languages. Unlike many of the other competitors it’s possible to translate between many more languages, including directly translating from French to Polish instead of having to translate into English first. This makes Google Translate a very functional application.

Who would you recommend the application to?

Although the translation is not perfect the website is ideal for anyone wanting to translate foreign text and get an understanding of it. Even though the language used isn’t perfect most people will be able to understand what it means, of course sometimes it does create complete gibberish. This website however is not suitable for anything where translation is vital, and it’s certainly not suitable for doing homework with!

GOOGLE DOES DADAIST TRANSLATION FOR FREE

“The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog,” translated English-Spanish and then Spanish-English, becomes “The stork plays the saxophone behind the lazy dog.” Could this be the birth of a new genre: Dada Processing?

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM LANGMATES:

R.J.

I think that there will always be people looking for cheap products. You get what you pay for. Clients who are aware of quality will choose human translators.

T.B.

I use Google Translate upon occasion to get the gist of a non-English text, but I refuse to use it for translations. I just have to look at the quality of the English output (often execrable) and extrapolate the result in the other direction.

J.D.

In Japanese the word “range” might also indicate a stove/ kitchen range…so while translating a patent on image processing device which comprises a term “radar range”…i often get “radar stove” provided by Google translate.

V.Y.

“The trend is for companies to use G.T. to cut back on costs, regardless of the quality”. German company XXX used some sort of MT engine to translate their Instruction Manual into English. Here’s some examples: “In the case it had to make him of it necessary the opening to first of all stop the operation of the cycle, to consider the temperature of the bath the massive structure of vapors that you can be emitted to the lifting of the cover, over that to the possible squirts of product.”and more: “During the operation of load or I unload pieces, the employment of fit garments to the purpose recommends him that don’t introduce free parts to get entangled themselves.”

LANGOLOGY language news

Road Testing Google Translate

14. Mar, 2010

http://www.langology.org/?p=180

Just how good is the new Google Translate? For The New York Times, it appears a breakthrough, proof that statistical processing of mountains of texts can go a long way, validating Google’s declared mission to organize the world’s information.

So I gave the site a relatively quick, unsystematic, and unscientific try. I’m not a linguist nor a translator, but I commissioned translations as a book editor. And I think that just as computer chess has increased rather than diminished interest in the game, electronic translation may bring better recognition of translation as a human art.

Google Translate relies on analysis of large bodies of text, just as computer chess analysis engines can draw on databases of every tournament game ever recorded. But it appears to perform better than older programs I’ve tried with less familiar languages like Hungarian, too, although a few words are still left in the original.

Among the Western European languages, I found a recent article that would show both the power and limits of the service in the magazine section of the German weekly newspaper Die Zeit, on a topic that resonates with many Americans: the decline of formerly flourishing industrial cities — in this case a kind of Middle European Middletown called Wittenberge. Google Translate still hasn’t mastered common expressions like “die Wende” in the first paragraph. Somebody reading “the turn” can easily deduce it’s a reference to 1989 and reunification. On the other hand, literalism can be seriously misleading. A project director declares in the last paragraph: “We’re not here to photograph the ruins and then cut down.” In the original, it’s “wieder abzuhauen” — maybe “cut and run” would be the closest equivalent. Google’s version might make some people wonder whether the researcher was talking about demolishing deserted buildings — a serious misunderstanding.

Still, an English speaker can get a good idea of the challenges facing Wittenberge’s citizens. And in the other direction, for German-speaking readers, here’s an article on a declining North Carolina textile town and the Google translation. I must say that the translated headline implies the opposite of the original, reading literally “When the Textile Factory Goes, Not So a Way to Live,” instead of “…So Goes a Way of Life.” (Come to think of it, the headline and body of the Google translation also confuse the sewing machine center Wittenberge with the better-known university town of Wittenberg, where Martin Luther taught and posted his 95 theses.)

The Experiment

Please excuse the chaotic format – I uploaded this in Word, in a four column format but this blog has dismantled everything. The first block of text is the original in English, the second is the human translation into Spanish, the third is Google Translate’s version and the fourth column, as yet empty, is for our comments. I encourage you to do similar evaluation experiments with G.T. to enable us all to make a critical analysis of what more and more of our clients are accepting instead of paying for quality human translations. This is a sad state affairs, mainly driven by the global economic crisis and by clients who are forced to put a drop in quality before paying the due price. As someone said in her blog here on Langmates, if you pay peanuts, you get 100 monkeys typing away on a typewriter till the complete works of Shakespeare come out (paraphrasing her a lot with poetic licence).

ORIGINAL IN ENGLISH

XXX payment flows

The Payment Co-ordination Agreement avoided the need for any fund flows on 30 July 2010 in order to complete, but there are some payments due following from completion and the payments covered by the Payment Co-ordination Agreement need to be reflected in the books of the relevant companies. This note therefore covers:

1.         a description of the payments covered by the Payment Co-ordination Agreement so that the relevant book entries can be made; and

2.         a note of the payments which still need to be made.

Payments covered by the Payment Co-ordination Agreement

1.         XXX subscribed for 4,596,976 shares in ZZZ for £4,596,976 payable by XXX to ZZZ

2.         ZZZ subscribed for 3,263,728 shares in SSS for £3,263,728 payable by ZZZ to SSS

3.         ZZZ lent £1,333,248 to PPP

4.         GGG paid PPP £33,662 of the Extra Fees due on 30 June 2010 (this being the sum that would have been repaid as principal on the loan to 30.6.10, had the loan been made at 1.1.10)

5.         PPP subscribed for 1,366,910 shares in SSS Limited for £1,366,910 payable by PPP to SSS

6.         SSS paid £4,630,638 to GGG by way of that amount of the Purchase Price (£4,631,638) of the vessels TTT and CCC (the Vessels).

7.         The full purchase price of the Vessels was £4,631,638, so £1,000 was left outstanding as a debt from SSS to GGG.

8.         GGG repaid debt owing to XXX of £4,596,976.

9.         The debt repayment by GGG to XXX in 8. above was exactly the amount of the subscription price of the shares which XXX subscribed for in ZZZ; accordingly, no fund transfers were required on 30 July 2010.

Payments still required to be made

Completion on 30 July 2010 brought into effect:

(a)         the Third Supplementary Agreement; and

(b)        the charters of the Vessels from SSS to GGG.

This triggered certain payment obligations in addition to those covered by the Payment Co-ordination Agreement as follows:

1. Third Supplementary Agreement Extra Fees:the Extra Fees in respect of 30 June 2010 are soon payable. The amount of those Extra Fees is not the normal £100,000, because it was reduced to £72,662 in the drafting of the Third Supplementary Agreement (a reduction of £27,338 which is equal to the amount which would have represented interest payable on the loan to 30.6.10, had there been a loan at 1.1.10 – see note 4 of Schedule 1 of the Third Supplemental Agreement). Of that £72,662, the sum of £33,662 was applied under the Payment Co-ordination Agreement (see para 4. of that section of this Note), but £39,000 remains payable to YYY. Under Clause 3.3 of the Third Supplementary Agreement, this is payable within 30 days of 30 July 2010, so by 27 August 2010 (30 days would strictly be 28 August 2010, but that is a Saturday).

Pursuant to note 5 of Schedule 1 of the Third Supplemental Agreement, the Extra Fees payable in respect of December 2010 will be £95,690 (not £100,000) (a reduction of £4,310 which is equal to the amount which would have represented interest payable on the loan from 1.7.10 to 30.7.10, had there been a loan at 1.1.10), of which £56,690 should be applied by YYY in repayment of capital and interest on ZZZ’s loan to YYY.

2.         Third Supplementary Agreement Monthly Fees and Other Fees: Schedules 1 and 2 to the Third Supplementary Agreement provide for Monthly Fees and Other Fees to be paid to YYY and to XXX in January, June and December. Clause 3.3 of the Third Supplementary Agreement provides that, to the extent that the amounts for these fees in the Third Supplementary Agreement is greater than their amount in the Second Supplementary Agreement, then the excess will be paid by 27 August 2010. The fees to which this will apply are:

(a)        The Monthly Fees for January to June 2010 inclusive; and

(b)        The Other Fees for January 2010 and June 2010.

The amount of the excess needs to be checked against the Second Supplementary Agreement figures.

The Monthly Fees payable to YYY (£20,600) and XXX (£20,600) for July 2010 are due by 14 August 2010, pursuant to note 1 in each of Schedules 1 and 2 of the Third Supplemental Agreement.

3.         Vessel Charters: hire fees: the charters of the Vessels start with effect from 1 January 2010, so rental is payable with effect from that date. Clause 5 of each of the charters provides that hire will be paid for 2010 in two equal instalments on execution of the charter and on 31 December 2010. This means that the first instalment under each charter was due from GGG to SSS on 30 July 2010 (the date of charter execution). The amounts are:

(a)        £80,000 in respect of the CCC; and

(b)        £40,000 in respect of the TTT

so £120,000 in total.

In summary, the remaining payments are:

  • £39,000 payable to YYY for its Extra Fees for June 2010. This is due 27 August 2010
  • Top up payment to each of YYY and XXX for its Monthly and Other Fees for 2010 so far, to bring the amount paid up to the new level from the levels applicable prior to execution of Third Supplementary Agreement. This is due 27 August 2010.
  • Monthly Fees for July 2010 for both YYY and XXX. These are payable by 14 August 2010.
  • £120,000 payable by GG as charter fees for January to June 2010. This is due immediately

HUMAN TRANSLATION INTO SPANISH

Flujos de pago de XXX

El Acuerdo sobre la Coordinación de Pagos evitó la necesidad de flujos de fondos el 30 de julio de 2010 a fin de formalizar el procedimiento, pero existen algunos pagos debidos como consecuencia de la realización y los pagos contemplados en el Acuerdo sobre la Coordinación de Pagos deben reflejarse en los libros de las correspondientes sociedades.Esta nota, por lo tanto, abarca:

1. Una descripción de los pagos cubiertos por el Acuerdo sobre la Coordinación de Pagos a fin de poder efectuar los ingresos de la libreta de referencia, y

2. Una nota de los pagos todavía pendientes.

Los pagos amparados por el Acuerdo sobre la Coordinación de Pagos

1.              XXX suscribió 4.596.976 acciones de ZZZ de £4.596.976 pagaderas por XXX a ZZZ

2.              ZZZ suscribió 3.263.728 acciones de SSS de £3.263.728 pagaderas por ZZZ a SSS

3. ZZZ prestó £1.333.248 a PPP

4. GGG pagó a PPP £33.662 de los Cargos Adicionales vencidas el 30 de junio de 2010 (siendo este el importe que se habría reembolsado como capital sobre el préstamo hasta el 30.6.10, en el caso que el préstamo se hubiera cedido con fecha del 1.1.10)

5.  PPP suscribió 1.366.910 acciones de SSS Limited por £1.366.910 pagaderas por PPP a SSS

6.  SSS pagó £4.630.638 a favor de GGG por concepto de esa cantidad del Precio de Compra (£4,631,638) correspondiente a los barcos TTT y CCC (los Buques).

7. El precio total de compra de los barcos fue de £4.631.638, por lo que se restaron £1.000 como pendiente del pago de la deuda de SSS a GGG.

8.  GGG devolvió la deuda, debido a XXX, de £4.596.976.

9.  La devolución de la deuda por GGG a XXX en el párrafo 8 de arriba, era precisamente el importe del precio de suscripción de las acciones que subscribió XXX en ZZZ; por lo tanto, no hizo falta la transferencia de fondos con fecha del 30 de julio de 2010.

Pagos todavía pendientes de efectuar.

Formalización con fecha del 30 de julio 2010 que ha entrado en vigor:

(a) el Tercer Acuerdo Adicional, y

(b) los charteos de los buques de SSS GGG.

Esta circunstancia dio lugar a ciertas obligaciones de pago, además de los contemplados en el Acuerdo sobre la Coordinación de Pagos, como sigue a continuación:

1. Tercer Acuerdo Adicional sobre Honorarios Adicionales:vence el abono de los Honorarios Adicionales respecto del 30 de junio de 2010 en fechas próximas. La cuantía de estos Honorarios Adicionales no es la suma normal de las £100.000, ya que se redujo a £72.662 de acuerdo con la redacción del Tercer Acuerdo Adicional (una reducción de £27.338, que equivale a la cantidad que habría supuesto el interés pagadero por el préstamo a fecha del 30.6.10, si hubiera habido un préstamo con fecha del 1.1.10 – referirse a la nota 4 de la Cédula 1 del Tercer Acuerdo Adicional). De esas £72.662, se aplicó el importe de £33.662 dentro del marco del Acuerdo sobre la Coordinación de Pagos (ver el párrafo 4 de ese apartado en esta Nota). Sin embargo, sigue siendo pagadero el importe de £39.000 a favor de YYY. Según la Cláusula 3.3 del Tercer Acuerdo Adicional, es pagadero dentro del plazo de 30 días, a contar desde el 30 de julio de 2010, de modo que el 27 de agosto de 2010 (estrictamente, los 30 días nos pondrían en el 28 de agosto de 2010, pero resulta que es un sábado).

En virtud de la nota 5 de la Cédula 1 del Tercer Acuerdo Adicional, los Honorarios Adicionales pagaderos con respecto al mes de diciembre de 2010 serán £95.690 (y no £100.000) (una reducción de £4.310 que equivale a la cantidad que habrían supuesto los intereses correspondientes al préstamo, del 1.7.10 al 30.7.10, si hubiera habido un préstamo con fecha del 1.1.10), del cual £56.690 deben ser aplicadas por YYY como reembolso de capital e intereses sobre el préstamo de ZZZ a YYY.

2.  Tercer Acuerdo Adicional y Otros Honorarios:  las Cédulas 1 y 2 del Tercer Acuerdo Adicional prevén tasas mensuales y otros honorarios, que se pagarán a YYY y a XXX, en los meses de enero, junio y diciembre. La Cláusula 3.3 del Tercer Acuerdo Adicional prevé que, en la medida en que los importes de estas tasas en el Tercer Acuerdo Adicional sean mayores que su cuantía en el Segundo Acuerdo Adicional, en este caso, el excedente será pagado antes del 27 de agosto de 2010. Los honorarios a los que será aplicable esta medida son:

(a) los Honorarios Mensuales de enero a junio 2010, ambos inclusive, y

(b) Los Otros Honorarios de enero de 2010 y junio de 2010.

El importe del exceso debe cotejarse con las cifras del Segundo Acuerdo Adicional.

Los Honorarios Mensuales que deben pagarse a YYY (£ 20,600) y a XXX (£ 20.600) para julio de 2010 se debe en un 14 agosto de 2010, de conformidad con la nota 1 en cada una de las Listas 1 y 2 del Tercer Acuerdo Adicional.

3.  Charteos de los Buques: los honorarios de arriendo:los charteos de los buques comienzan a partir del 1 enero de 2010, de modo que el charteo abona a partir de esa fecha. La Cláusula 5 de cada uno de los charteos prevé que se pagará el charteo  correspondiente al año 2010 en dos cuotas iguales en el momento de ejecutar el charteo y el 31 de diciembre de 2010.Esto significa que el primero pago según cada charteo fue debido, de GGG a SSS, el 30 de julio de 2010 (fecha de ejecución del charteo). Los importes son los siguientes:

(a) £80.000 con respecto al CCC,y

(b) £40.000 con respecto al TTT

siendo £120.000 en total.

En resumen, los pagos restantes son:

  • £39.000 a nombre de YYY por sus Honorarios Adicionales correspondientes al mes de junio de 2010. Vence el 27 de agosto 2010.
  • Un pago de recarga a YYY y a XXX correspondiente a sus Honorarios Mensuales y demás gastos mensuales para el año 2010 hasta la fecha, hasta alcanzar el importe pagado hasta el nuevo nivel de los niveles aplicables antes de la ejecución del Tercer Acuerdo Adicional. Vence el 27 de agosto 2010.
  • Honorarios Mensualescorrespondientes al mes de julio de 2010 a YYY y a XXX. Son pagaderos antes del 14 de agosto de 2010.
  • £120.000 pagaderas por GGG a SSS por concepto de honorarios de charteo, de enero a junio de 2010. Vence de inmediato.

VERSION BY GOOGLE TRANSLATE INTO SPANISH

XXX flujos de pago

El Acuerdo de Pago de Coordinación evitado la necesidad de flujos de fondos el 30 de julio de 2010 a fin de completar, pero hay algunos pagos debidos como consecuencia de la realización y los pagos contemplados en el Acuerdo de Pago de Coordinación deben reflejarse en los libros de las correspondientes sociedades. Esta nota cuenta por lo tanto:

1. Una descripción de los pagos cubiertos por el Acuerdo de Pago de Coordinación para que los ingresos de la libreta de referencia puede hacerse, y

2. Una nota de los pagos que aún deben realizarse.

Los pagos amparados por el pago de Coordinación Acuerdo

1.    XXX suscribió 4.596.976 acciones de ZZZ de £ 4,596,976 a pagar por XXX a ZZZ

2.  ZZZ suscribió 3.263.728 acciones de SSS £ 3,263,728 para pagar por ZZZ a SSS

3.  ZZZ prestado £ 1,333,248 a la PPP

4. GGG PPP pagó £ 33.662 de las tasas adicionales por el 30 de junio de 2010 (siendo este el importe que se habría sido devuelta en la forma principal en el préstamo de 30.6.10, el préstamo había sido dictado en 1.1.10)

5.  PPP suscribió 1.366.910 acciones de SSS Limited para £ 1,366,910 a pagar por la PPP a SSS

6.  SSS pagó £ 4,630,638 de GGG en concepto de esa cantidad del precio de compra (£ 4,631,638) de los barcosyTTT(losvasos).

7.  El precio total de compra de los barcos fue £ 4,631,638, por lo que £ 1.000 que quedaba pendiente de pago una deuda de SSS a GGG.

8.  GGG pagado la deuda, debido a XXX de £ 4,596,976.

9.  El pago de la deuda por GGG para XXX en 8. anterior era exactamente el importe del precio de suscripción de las acciones que XXX suscribirse para ZZZ; en consecuencia, no se requiere la transferencia de fondos el 30 de julio de 2010.

Pagos sin que deban realizarse en

Finalización de 30 de julio 2010 entraron en vigor:

(A) el Tercer Acuerdo Complementario, y

(B) las cartas de los buques de SSS GGG.

Esto dio lugar a ciertas obligaciones de pago, además de los contemplados en el Acuerdo de Pago de Coordinación de la siguiente manera:

1.  Tercer Acuerdo Complementario Extra Honorarios:los honorarios adicionales respecto de 30 de junio de 2010 se abona antes.La cuantía de esos gastos de reserva no es el normal £ 100.000, ya que se redujo a £ 72.662 en la redacción de la cláusula adicional tercera (una reducción de £ 27.338, que es igual a la cantidad que habrían supuesto un interés a pagar por el préstamo a 30.6.10, si hubiera habido un préstamo en el 1,1.10 – véase la nota 4 del anexo 1 del Acuerdo Suplementario Tercera).De esa £ 72.662, la suma de £ 33.662 se aplicó en el marco del Acuerdo de Pago de Coordinación (véase el párrafo 4. De esa sección de esta nota), pero sigue siendo £ 39.000 a nombre de YYY. Según el artículo 3.3 del Tercer Acuerdo complementario, se trata de pagar dentro de 30 días, de 30 de julio de 2010, para el 27 de agosto de 2010 (30 días estrictamente, sería: 28 de agosto de 2010, pero que es un sábado).

De conformidad con la nota 5 del anexo 1 del Tercer Acuerdo Suplementario, las tasas extra a pagar en concepto de diciembre de 2010 se £ 95,690 (£ 100,000 no) (una reducción de £ 4310 que es igual a la cantidad que habrían supuesto un interés a pagar por el préstamo del 1.7.10 al 30.7.10, si hubiera habido un préstamo a 1.1.10), de los cuales £ 56.690 debe ser aplicada por YYY en pago de capital e interés del préstamo ZZZ a YYY.

2.              En tercer lugar complementaria mensual percibida en los acuerdos y otros cargos:las Listas 1 y 2 del Acuerdo Complementario terceros prevén tasas mensuales y otros cargos que se pagará a YYY y XXX en enero, junio y diciembre.Cláusula 3.3 del Tercer Acuerdo complementario se dispone que, en la medida en que los importes de estas tasas en el Tercer Acuerdo complementario es mayor que su importe en el Segundo Acuerdo Complementario, a continuación, el excedente será pagado antes del 27 de agosto de 2010. Los derechos a que esta medida será aplicable son los siguientes:

(A) las cuotas mensuales de enero a junio 2010, ambos inclusive, y

(B) Los Otros Costos de enero de 2010 y junio de 2010.

El importe del exceso debe cotejarse con las cifras Segundo Acuerdo Complementario.

Las cuotas mensuales que deben pagarse a YYY (£ 20,600) y XXX (£ 20,600) para julio de 2010 se debe en un 14 agosto de 2010, de conformidad con la nota 1 en cada una de las Listas 1 y 2 del Tercer Acuerdo Suplementario.

3.  Cartas del buque: las tasas de alquiler:las cartas de los buques inicio a partir del 1 enero de 2010, para alquiler se abona a partir de esa fecha.Cláusula 5 de cada una de las cartas se establece que se pagará de alquiler para el año 2010 en dos cuotas iguales en la ejecución de la carta y el 31 de diciembre de 2010. Esto significa que el primer tramo de cada oferta se debió de GGG de Ggg el 30 de julio de 2010 (fecha de alquiler de ejecución). Los importes son los siguientes:

(A) £ 80.000 en relación con laCCC,y

(B) £ 40.000 en relación con elTTT

lo £ 120.000 en total.

En resumen, los pagos restantes son:

·       £ 39000 a nombre de YYY por sus honorarios extra para junio de 2010.Esto se debe 27 de agosto 2010

·       un pago más arriba a cada uno de YYY y XXX para su, y demás gastos mensuales para el año 2010 hasta la fecha, hasta alcanzar el importe pagado hasta el nuevo nivel de los niveles aplicables antes de la ejecución del Tercer Acuerdo Complementario.Esto se debe 27 de agosto 2010.

·       FEEEmensualesde julio de 2010 para ambas YYY y XXX.ESEThse pagará el 14 de agosto de 2010.

·       £ 120,000 a cargo de GGG para SSS como honorarios de la carta de enero a junio de 2010.Esto se debe inmediatamente.

Lost In (Machine) Translation  by Lee Vann, Thursday, July 8, 2010, 9:17 AM

http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=131598

Last March, I shared a theory of mine that most Hispanics expect Spanish-language web sites to be poor quality and, as a result, use the English-language version of a site even if Spanish is their preferred language. Expectations tend to be low because often the Spanish-language version of a given web site tends to be inferior to the English version.

With Google’s free machine translation software, Google Translate, showing up on an increasing number of web sites, I’m afraid that Hispanic online expectations are at risk of declining further.

Google Translate is Free. Or is it?

Many marketers and web managers looking to reach Spanish speakers online view Google Translate as the silver bullet. Copy and paste a little snippet of code into your web site and, presto, your web site is now available in Spanish (or any other language). As a result, you can now find Google Translate on many web sites including those of countless federal, state and local governments.

What you will also find on these web sites is a lengthy disclaimer that prominently states that content translated by Google may not be accurate, reliable or timely. These disclaimers also completely absolve the web site owner of any and all liability that may arise because of inaccurate machine translation. I want to be very clear: web site owners are consciously using a system to translate their web sites and, in the same breath, acknowledging the system may not provide accurate, reliable or timely results.

I believe the cost of potentially inaccurate, unreliable or dated content on any web site is simply too high for my clients.  Even the smallest translation mistake can destroy the credibility of a web site and the organization behind it, severely impacting valuable goodwill.

So no, Google Translate is not free. In fact it can be very costly.

Effective Communication Requires a Human Voice

Eventually, technology may be able to provide near-perfect translations but, today, professional communications experts are needed to produce accurate, reliable and timely translations. It is true that most professional translators leverage machine translation as part of their process. Once a machine provides a systematic conversion of text from one language to another, a human is needed to deconstruct the context of the original message and provide an appropriate and meaningful communication. There is no way to build valuable relationships with your customers without involving talented writers.

Clearly, Google’s powerful brand, strong credibility, and free service have lured many marketers to use Google Translate.

I wonder if Google’s brand would be so powerful if it used only machine translation to write the copy on its sites.

“Wired” magazine, February 2010, gives us an insight into the Google-Babel Fish technological fusion, which means goodbye to bye to human phone interpreting

http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2010/02/googles-real-time-voice-translator-could-make-any-language-lingua-franca/

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Google’s Real-Time Voice Translator Could Make Any Language Lingua Franca

The real-time-translating Babel Fish from Douglas Adams' Hitchhikers' Guide to the Galaxy was named for the Tower of Babel, a biblical structure fractured by linguistic confusion.The real-time-translating Babel Fish from Douglas Adams’ Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy was named for the Tower of Babel, a biblical structure fractured by linguistic confusion. 

Google engineers are working on a translator for Google Android smartphones to convert one language into another quickly enough to allow speakers without a common language to communicate with one another in near real time.

We’ve seen a few stabs at this concept, like a 63,000-word real-time translator and a cute 400-phrase iPhone app, both of which we compared to Douglas Adams’ Babel Fish from his Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy novels — the same comparison drawn by Times Online and Mashable about Google’s voice translation plans.

The comparison is still apt; and now, Adams’ vision of a plurality of languages communicating smoothly with one another is closer to reality. Google says it plans to release a basic version of its first real-time translation services in two years.

Google has its work cut out for it. Translation presents a tougher challenge than re-imagining e-mail or copying Microsoft Office as a cloud-based service. Humans are nuanced communicators — which is why, to date, the translators we’ve seen are basically elaborate gimmicks, limited by the size of their dictionaries and inability to parse phrases.

As usual, Google’s goal is loftier: to enable real-time translation of spoken meaning, rather than just words. To do this, the company is cobbling together its voice recognition, 52-language text translation, and text-to-speech technologies into a unified voice-to-voice translator. (Actually, the full path would be “voice-to-text-to-translation-to-voice.”)

“We think speech-to-speech translation should be possible and work reasonably well in a few years’ time,” Franz Och, Google’s head of translation services, told Times Online. “Clearly, for it to work smoothly, you need a combination of high-accuracy machine translation and high-accuracy voice recognition, and that’s what we’re working on.”

Google has at least two tricks up its sleeve for improving the accuracy of its translation system: crawling web pages and documents in various languages to improve its artificial understanding of how each language works, and analyzing entire phrases before offering a translation, rather than just translating individual words.

“The future… looks very interesting,” added Och. “If you have a Babel Fish, the need to learn foreign languages is removed.”

Some speculated that globalization and the internet will spawn a global monoculture. But if real-time translation is real, and available on the average mobile phone, technology could also have the opposite effect: to preserve many of the world’s 6,000 or so spoken languages.

Read More http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2010/02/googles-real-time-voice-translator-could-make-any-language-lingua-franca/#ixzz12zW760Im //

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About ianemmett

ESPAÑOL & ENGLISH Translator and interpreter for over 20 years - I get paid for doing something I enjoy. Tonnes of articles translated
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